Parrots are like small children, ever playful and curious. They will scrutinize their surroundings very carefully, homing in on things like plants, electrical cords, and chemicals to name a few. The dangers they face whether loose in your house or yard are considerable and it is up to you, the owner to prevent situations from occuring that could seriously injure or even kill your beloved parrot. Here are three things you may want to consider before you bring your beloved parrot out of his cage for play time and exercise.

Accidents:

Toilet seat lids should be kept closed to keep your Parrot from drowning. Wings should be clipped so he can’t escape through an open window and keep him away from areas where you may have mouse traps or flypaper hanging as these can also be detrimental to his health. Turn off ceiling fans when your parrot is out of its cage and Keep him out of the kitchen where a hot stove, sudden changes in temperature, or fumes could do irreparable harm to him. Keep him away from any electrical cords as he will chew through them. Don’t take him outside on a cold day and keep his cage away from drafty or overly sunny windows. Even though they come from a tropical country, they can still get heatstroke. Keep the cage just a few feet away from the window This way he can still look outside.

Even some of the toys you buy for your Parrot can harm him. It is important to use caution and examine these toys closely. Examine your Parrots rope toys for frayed or unbraided rope as this rope may get tangled around his neck and strangle him. Bells and chains can snare toes and beaks which is why i don’t buy bells for my Macaw and any chains i buy are stainless steel. Galvanized chain will kill your Parrot because of the chemicals in the metal. Keep an eye on plush toys and huts to make sure your Parrot isn’t ingesting the material.

Fumes and Poisons:

Any substance that gives off a vapor can be potentially deadly to your Parrot. Here are some of the things to keep him away from.

  • aerosols
  • cigarette smoke
  • fingernail polish remover
  • Plug-in air fresheners
  • fumes from overheated non-stick cookware
  • other Teflon-coated products
  • space heaters
  • pine-scented car air fresheners

If you have to use these products, keep your Parrot out of the room and open the windows for ventilation. Lead paint is also poisonous so its time to remove it if you have any. Many well known plants and trees in your house or back yard are poisonous when ingested, so keep your Parrot away from them. If he ingests any poisonous substance, and starts to vomit or have a siezure. Remove him from the source and call your vet immediately.

Other Pets:

The safest household for a parrot is one without cats or dogs. If you must have other animals, there are a couple of things to keep in mind. Never allow a Parrot and a cat to roam around in the house at the same time and never leave a dog unsupervised around a Parrot that is out of its cage. Despite his powerful beak, he may still get the short end of the stick when it comes to your cat or dog no matter how mellow they may be. An instinctual impulse could change things in a second. Also, a cats saliva contains a bacteria called pasteruella, which can be fatal to your Parrot. The general rule….Parrots are helpless against animals equipped with sharp claws and teeth, so its best to keep them separated.

It’s good to bring your Parrot outside for fresh air and playtime as long as you don’t leave him unattended. Even though he may be clipped, he can still flutter short distances and may be able to clear a backyard fence. In seconds, he could be dinner for an agile alley cat or other bold predator. I’ve even heard of cases where hawks have snatched Parrots off their owners shoulders. If you are going to have your Parrot outside for extended periods where you cant watch him all the time, it is probably wise to build him an aviary. Build it with double walls to keep any predators out.

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